Friday, February 10, 2017

Two Acronyms Every Military Spouse Should Know

Today's prompt for #LoveBlog is secrets. At first I wasn't sure where to go with this prompt since we don't keep secrets in our relationship. Then, I realized that there is one area where "secrets" exist for us and it relates to safety and the military.



My husband's job often takes him into dangerous situations. This is pretty common with the military. It is also why protection of information and "keeping information secret" is important. In fact, there are two phrases that every military family member should know and practice on a daily basis.

OPSEC
This term is short for "Operations Security" and should be practiced at all times by the military member and family members. Military members will have even more practice with this term since they have access to a lot of sensitive information. There are times though when family members have access to information such as deployment start and end dates. In these cases, it's important for family members to keep sensitive information to themselves. It's perfectly okay to say "I don't know" even if you do know the answer. Remember to keep safety in mind at all times.

PERSEC
This term refers to the phrase "Personal Security" and is extremely important for family members. Once again, it is important to think through the information that you are sharing with others. I recommend asking yourself the following question before sharing any information with others (especially on a public social media platform): Could someone use this information to harm my loved ones?

Of all the military acronyms that you'll hear over time, these two are the most important ones since they refer to safety and security. It may feel like you're keeping secrets but that's okay since it's for a good reason. If your friends and family have a hard time understanding this, then you might want to explain the two terms to them. After all, a lot of miscommunication is a result of misunderstanding.


1 comment:

  1. I think this is important for non military families to know. I am a military brat and thankfully, even when m dad was serving in Iraq in 2004, I still knew where he was and what he was doing.

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